September 28, 2021

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Cooking Is My World

Seattle’s biggest doughnut? Best savory pastry? Foods critic Tan Vinh ate 100 pastries to identify these favorites

5 min read

I devote an uncomfortable total of time scrolling as a result of menus and Instagram meals posts each individual working day. Currently, my obsession has been pastries the most exciting noshes I have observed have been driving the glass displays at dessert stores and patisseries.

Doughnuts, for instance, the go-to dunking vessel for a cup of joe, now get reimagined as a savory treat — from a doughnut tummy-filled with chive cream cheese and topped preferred an everything-seasoning bagel (at The Flour Box in Hillman Metropolis) to a ham-and-smoked-paprika brioche doughnut (at Temple Pastries in the Central District).

In contrast to most meal takeout alternatives, pastries hold up properly they taste as superior eating in as they do when you are snacking on the operate. Possibly that’s why even all through a pandemic, numerous bakeries have opened and stayed busy, led by young skills this kind of as the self-taught baker Pamela Vuong of The Flour Box and the Paris-properly trained cook M. Fairoz Rashed of SUSU Dessert Bar in the Chinatown Intercontinental District.

In the past two months, I have been examining out new bakeries all-around city, focusing primarily on those that have opened in the past 12 months. So which offers the most exciting pastry? The greatest doughnut? The greatest savory baked superior? See down below.

SUSU Dessert Bar

665 S. King St., Seattle 833-953-5665 fb.com/sususeattle

The Kouign-amann from SUSU Dessert Bar in the Chinatown Global District, a croissant-like pastry enveloped in a caramelized crust, is considerably sought-following. Psst, go early. (Ken Lambert / The Seattle Periods)

SUSU is arguably the greatest bakery to debut in Seattle in 2020, but it does not require to toot its own horn. Their enthusiasts present lots of pomp and sound outcomes in advance of doorways open, urgent their noses from the window and snapping Instagram pictures although swooning with “oohs and aahs” each time a cake would make it down the runway of the cashier counter.

Chef Rashed, who has worked at a number of Michelin-rated places to eat in France, now operates his own shop, a wander-up window subsequent to an alley in the Chinatown Worldwide District. Their affordable authentic estate is why their pastries price tag a buck more affordable than most of the prime bakeries all over city. When SUSU debuted past spring, proprietors Rashed and Katie Pohl chalked the extended line to the typical excitement that arrives with each and every grand opening. But 8 months into their run, the queue has grown absurdly for a longer period, with lovers lining up in the rain ahead of doorways open up. Their hours are posted as 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fridays via Sundays, but all their greatest hits market out by midday. Come at 2 p.m. and your consolidation prize is likely a cookie.

Their big Kouign-amann ($4.75), a croissant-like pastry enveloped in a caramelized crust, is a great deal sought-soon after. But you can get a good Kouign-amann at several bakeries with no having to hold out. Their significantly less-sexy lineup is a improved catch: apple-cinnamon pound cake with a dollop of brandy cream, the puck-sized apricot Stilton financier and the pâté à choux with Earl Grey cream for starters.

SUSU’s most underrated baked great, and what it does improved than everyone, are savory scones ($3.85) that control to be moist and a bit crumbly, with funky, bold flavors like a crab-and-curry combo and an additional model with blue cheese and kimchi. They are not to be missed.

The Flour Box

5520 Rainier Ave. S., Seattle theflourboxseattle.com

Our food critic Tan Vinh declared the crème brûlée brioche doughnut with a vanilla custard filling from The Flour Box the best doughnut in Seattle. (Tan Vinh / The Seattle Times)
Our food critic Tan Vinh declared the crème brûlée brioche doughnut with a vanilla custard filling from The Flour Box the ideal doughnut in Seattle. (Tan Vinh / The Seattle Situations)

Baker Vuong helps make the most effective doughnuts in the metropolis ideal now. Her puffy brioche doughnuts have gorgeous honeycomb constructions with this sort of a distinctively wet mouthfeel that they make quite a few other yeast doughnuts flavor dry in comparison. She also does cakes and other baked products, but her doughnuts are the attraction, with fillings ranging from durian to a banana-coconut milk. A fan beloved is when she soups up the traditional vanilla custard filling with a torched crème brûlée ($4) on best of the doughnut, a smoky, sugary sheen to go with a creamy filling with flecks of vanilla beans. Hers rivals the stellar Cointreau Crème Brûlée doughnut at Blue Star in Portland. For now, you can only buy her doughnuts on line setting up at 10 a.m. But you gotta be swift on the draw since her sweets market out within just 5 minutes.

Temple Pastries

2524 S. Jackson St., Seattle templepastries.com

Our food critic Tan Vinh called the furikake croissant at Temple Pastries “the best savory pastry he’s had in recent years.” The square-shaped croissant is topped with sea salt, bonito flake, seaweed and black sesame seed. To finish: a squiggly shaving of sweet potato on top and a drizzle of sesame oil. (Courtesy of Temple Pastries)
Our food critic Tan Vinh called the furikake croissant at Temple Pastries “the most effective savory pastry he’s had in new decades.” The square-shaped croissant is topped with sea salt, bonito flake, seaweed and black sesame seed. To end: a squiggly shaving of sweet potato on major and a drizzle of sesame oil. (Courtesy of Temple Pastries)

Out of the 100 pastries I’ve sampled close to town, the most unforgettable was in this Central District bakeshop, a savory baked good that is basically a Japanese sesame soba noodle bowl reimagined as a croissant. Powering the display situation, the square-formed croissant appears to be dressed like an all the things-seasoning bagel with the area coated in sea salt and furikake seasoning (the latter a medley of black sesame seeds, bonito flakes and seaweed). To end, this croissant is topped with a squiggly shaving of sweet potato and a shower of sesame oil on the area.

There’s a whole lot heading on in this article, but baker Christina Wooden pulls it off. This pastry still has the flaky, buttery DNA of a croissant albeit tweaked with a nutty, earthy taste from the buckwheat flour. What binds these elements jointly is the top secret ingredient, the Japanese seasoning furikake, which offers this croissant a burst of umami the sweet potato cuts into the salty seasoning, just a great cornucopia of flavors and textures. Now for the bad information. The furikake croissant is not on this week’s menu, but Wooden vows to deliver it again. In the meantime, Temple Pastries’ cronuts and cruffins are also popular on weekends.